Student wins Orwell Prize for insightful account of Muslim life

Thu, 29/06/2017 - 12:49 -- baigente

Yasmin O’Mahoney has won the George Orwell Literary Prize for her passionate account about modern day life as a British Muslim.

She was awarded the national Prize for her essay ‘Different?’ on Tuesday at Pembroke College, Oxford after competing against 178 writers aged 13-18.
The final round of the Prize was judged by award-winning writer, journalist and Orwell Fellow Nicci Gerrard, while George Orwell’s son, Richard Blair, presented Yasmin with her award on the day.

‘Different?’ was written in response to the competition’s brief, which asked entrants to write about the theme of ‘identity’.
The essay chronicles the fifteen-year-old’s experience growing up in a multicultural family, and includes a vivid depiction of a family dinner where the physical differences between her Irish father and Pakistani mother are thrown into relief.

The winning entry also records how the Lewes student came to terms with her Asian appearance while living in a predominantly white area, and discusses the misrepresentation of Muslims in the media by contrasting stereotypes of Islam that she encounters in her daily life with first-hand memories of her grandparents.

Kieran O’Mahoney, Yasmin’s father, said: “We are so proud of Yasmin. She’s an avid reader – she has wall-to-wall shelves full of everything from Harry Potter to Shakespeare – and she’s always writing, so having heard about the competition from her Uncle, she was very keen to enter the Prize. She wrote from the heart, and I think her passion for the subject is what makes the composition so powerful and beautiful. She has never been afraid to speak her mind and we learn from her on a daily basis”.

Yasmin said: “I was up against some really tough competition so it was a great surprise to win. Hearing an Oxford graduate read the last three paragraphs of my essay was an unforgettable experience, and I was honoured when a Muslim family came up to me afterwards and said how deeply they’d been touched. I feel even more motivated to keep writing!”

Robert Blewitt, Headteacher of LOGS, said: “Yasmin’s success serves as inspiration for other pupils and her writing offers a valuable insight into the diversity of culture in modern Britain. Her style is mature way beyond her years and we have high hopes for her future career.”

READ YASMIN'S ESSAY